strugglebrother

Transition from bathroom tiles to concrete

strugglebrother
el último mes

I'm looking to transition from our bathroom to our concrete floors. We missed doing this when the bathroom was tiled. What are our options now?


Preferably I would like to use something in metal and black. The height difference is 7/16.


Thankful for any advice



Comentarios (23)

  • kudzu9
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    You might have trouble finding a black, metal threshold that has just the right profile and dimensions to install cleanly and not collect dirt in the crevices. If it were me, I'd get a simple oak threshold about 3/4" thick and rabbet out one edge to just fit over the tile. Prime it, spray paint it black, and use construction adhesive and some temporary weights (paint cans, books, etc.) to hold it in place until the adhesive cures. Then run a thin bead of caulk along the seam where the tile meets the threshold so it's not a dust catcher.

  • strugglebrother
    Autor original
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    Thanks, yeah I had that idea too. Guess I wanted metal as it would look better than wood. Wouldn't 3/4 be too high since I'm 7/16?


    But yeah we could rabbet out or sand it down a bit, I think the rabbet cut on the 3/4 is about 0.360 and we need 0.4375

  • Super Lumen
    el último mes

    In my experience, painted floor transition strips always wear through the paint eventually and look like crap, metal or wood. I'd just go to a fabricator and get a strip of angled stainless steel with a 7/16" inside dimension and lay it on there in silicone adhesive and call it good. It will look nice and clean, not show wear if it is scratched, and won't rust in your bathroom environment. If you ever need it up for some reason, you can get it off without breaking the tile.

  • kudzu9
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    struggle-

    You don't want something the same thickness as the tile just butted up against it. I suggested 3/4" thick material as it wouldn't stick up too high, but would let you do a 7/16" rabbet for the tile, while leaving about a 5/16" tongue protecting and covering the tile edge. I was thinking something like this:



  • SJ McCarthy
    el último mes

    The tile installer *should have made a comment about the transition. They often use schluter transitions but they have to be put in AT THE SAME TIME as the tile. The tiler also has to KNOW the requirement/height of the OTHER FLOOR when it is FINISHED so they can purchase/source the correct product for the homeowner.


    Is there a reason these points were not made at the time the tiles were being installed?

  • Lori Meyer
    el último mes

    No suggestions but we just laid this same floor a few days ago. Love it!

  • SJ McCarthy
    el último mes

    Did you explain to the installer that your concrete is the FINISHED floor outside and that you would LIKE him/her to figure out a transition?


    Yes. The tile is very handsome. I've always liked these types of tiles.

  • strugglebrother
    Autor original
    el último mes

    @SJ McCarthy It's a mix of different subcontractors doing parts of the house at different times. It is probably my fault that I didn't understand that the transition should have been installed when the tiles were laid. The installer could have emphasized this of course but I'm not blaming anyone in this case. I fully understand that this turned into a sad afterthought.


    @kudzu9 yes what you drew I have found but I'm also a bit worried about the foot traffic onto painted wood. But that could definitely be a solution if nothing else.


    @Super Lumen What fabricator could help me with a metal transition with a 7/16" inside dimension. I have been looking deep deep online in product catalogs for metal transitions and thought there would be a product for something like this. I found this https://www.ceramictool.com/ctc-reducer.html But it's not high enough. Any tips on who could help me make something in metal as you suggest would be much helpful.


    @Lori Meyer Yes work in progress here, not finished yet with the bathroom but we are very happy with the floor too!



  • kudzu9
    el último mes

    I understand your concern about potential wear...but how often do you step on a threshold when entering a room? I don’t :-)

  • millworkman
    el último mes

    You could also have a pc of solid surface or quartz shaped the same as kudzu's pc of wood.

  • kbuescher
    el último mes

    Can I change the subject? Sorry. Is this a home you have lived in for awhile...with the bare concrete floors? I would like to leave our basement floors bare concrete. Just add sealant or epoxy. I think they are beautiful that way. I recently posted a discussion on here asking everyone‘s opinions. Now I am second guessing myself. Concerned about maintenance, cost, lack of noise reduction and coldness.

  • kudzu9
    el último mes

    kbuescher- Please start your own thread, rather than hijacking this one. Those are entirely different issues.

  • Sammy
    el último mes

    Have you looked at the Schluter RENO-RAMP-K?




  • just_janni
    el último mes

    Black will be tough


    I've bought a ton of thresholds from these folks:


    https://www.tmhardware.com


    there are more thresholds than you can ever imagine and they cut to 1/4" increments.



  • PRO
    Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co.
    el último mes

    Schluter as mentioned earlier is a good way to go. You could also remove some of the tile and go for another material, such as marble, and use that as a threshold. The most economical method would be schluter.

  • strugglebrother
    Autor original
    el último mes

    @Sammy @Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co. Yeah I did look at the Schluter Reno Ramp also, but it's 0.5 in height and I'm stuck with 0.4375 in height. It also looks more like a wheel chair acess than something I'd want. But worst case.... yes


    @Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co. Marble could be a good idea for sure!


    @just_janni That is a great site! All their half threasholds are either 0.5 (too hight) or 0.25 (too low). Maybe the too low option is better and you can have it leaning down.. Hmm


    @millworkman We haven't installed our quartz kitchen countertops yet. I wonder if I can get my quartz installer to make me something, that could be a brilliant idea!

  • PRO
    Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co.
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    How about Schluter Reno-U - comes in 7/16. It installs underneath the tile, so you'd either need to remove and replace some tile or add some tile. Here are the specs: https://sccpublic.s3-external-1.amazonaws.com/sys-master/images/h80/h9a/9055349080094/Floor%20Profiles%20Data%20Sheet.pdf

    That would be a lower cost solution than fabricating a threshold.

  • Sammy
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    Yeah, if you’re willing to do a little minor surgery, the Schluter RENO-U is a good choice. (Actually, if you’re willing to do a little minor surgery your choices are virtually limitless.) Or you could look at the RENO-V, which is adjustable, so if you ever decide you’re sick of the concrete you can keep the transition even if you install new flooring.






    Edited to add that this profile does not come in 7/16”, but it does come in 3/8”.

  • strugglebrother
    Autor original
    el último mes

    @Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co. & @Sammy


    I think this is the best solution to the problem. I have the same tile installer coming to do a backsplash in our kitchen, so let's do that surgery at the end of the room and stick one of those slick Schluter Reno U or V. Aluminum would work well with the polished chrome Schluter we have in the bathroom too!

  • strugglebrother
    Autor original
    el último mes

    Saying that... The door was installed AFTER the tile, can we break this up?


    Or is there a way with a chisel to get under the tiles (to remove the grout) to slide in the Schluter?




  • kudzu9
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    There’s no way to “chisel under the tiles,” or excavate in any way, that doesn’t involve dislodging all those little pieces of partial tiles, including the diamonds. It could even result in weakening the bonds of neighboring tiles, which might not show up immediately. And once the little pieces were dislodged you would to clean their backs or use new pieces. Frankly, at this stage you should look for installing a threshold that doesn’t involve a lot of re-work and/or possibly compromising the installed tile edge. That’s why I proposed a rabbeted threshold. It may not be perfect, but it will work, and it will avoid all the headache and expense involved in doing a retro install of metal edging that should have been put in before the last bit of tile was laid at that doorway. Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.

  • strugglebrother
    Autor original
    el último mes
    Última modificación: el último mes

    @kudzu9 The cut line of the tiles isn't completely straight. I'm not sure if the threshold will line up against the tiles? We probably have to cut a line at least where the last grout line is?


    I have some boxes of more tiles to use for repair



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