normanne_gibson

Do you want to see pix of CRACKED NEOLITH?

Poppy Potter
hace 3 años
Fair warning to anyone considering Neolith...I, too, was excited about all of the supposed benefits of this product and spent a lot of time researching what material to use. I absolutely 100% regret the choice of Neolith. It has been a complete nightmare. Many slabs broke just during the transport of the product including those transported and moved by Neolith distributors. That caused huge delays in getting the product fabricated and installed. Then several more slabs broke on the fabricator's table causing more delay and stress. Neolith distributor oversaw the fabrication of the material and trained the installer. Less than one week after installation with ZERO USE or anyone even touching it, we noticed cracking in several places. There is NO REPAIRING this product. It must be completely ripped out and replaced. Neolith, The Size, the distributor, and the fabricator/installer are all blaming each other and saying they each have no responsibility for fixing this project. The fight has been going on for more than a year now with each party pointing the finger at someone else, and I, the customer, who paid thousands of dollars for the project is stuck in the middle having to file law suits just to even get my money back, let alone pay the increased expense of having this failure ripped out and redone...and how on earth could I reinstall this same product after such a terrible experience? The manufacturer will say they will "replace" the product itself but that does not begin to cover the huge expense and time of ripping out and redoing the whole project, nor does it guarantee that the same thing won't happen again. You will continually see the manufacturer say they stand behind the product IF their installation manual is followed and the fabricator is trained, etc...,but RED FLAG warning everyone...that is their legal loophole for providing no guarantee except for possibly replacing the actual product. That is the least expensive part of these fiascos. The distributor will have a similar loophole in their guarantee and the installer/fabricator will blame the product. All in all, it is NOT WORTH IT. Stay away from this mess. Below are pix of the numerous cracks and the seams separate over time making this look even worse. I am only not mentioning specific names of the distributor and fabricator/installer because we are in the middle of legal proceedings. But they are on these threads constantly trying to sell this product. We can not even move on to replacing this mess until the legal aspect has concluded. Save yourself a lot of heartache and use something else. And wish me luck that someone will take responsibility for this failure. Houzz only lets me post four pix but there are many more cracks and separated seams. Don't believe the excuses you will hear from the people making money on all aspects of these projects.

Comentarios (152)

  • James Beltran
    hace 2 años

    Thank you Poppy, as well as all the others. We are building a 4,000 sqft home here in Los Altos and were actually considering Porcelain counters and walls in the kitchen and baths (GC kept pushing us towards Porcelain instead of Quartz and Marble telling us how much better it was). My concern was exactly what you are posting here (thinness, cracking, chipping, printed layer instead of full material color, etc.). Your post just saved me over $100k on product that obviously isn't all it's cracked up to be. I will insist on my materials of choice. Thank you again...

  • Hamlet Wong
    el último año
    Última modificación: el último año

    I just installed a gorgeous fireplace encased in Neolith. Mine is a uniform white colour. It’s cracking on two separate sides with hairline cracks under the surface. It was guaranteed very strong and able to withstand high temps! I’m horrified! Now what??

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    el último año

    I'm betting on fabricator/installer error, not heat. Pictures please.

  • Hamlet Wong
    el último año



  • Carol
    el último año

    Sorry this is terrible. I regret getting Neolith but I"m stuck with it for the foreseeable future. My daughter was walking by the counter with a bottle and she hit the corner and it chipped. No scratches on the bottle. I bought some epoxy for $7.99 on Amazon and filled the corner. I don't want to spend another cent on this counter. I'm hoping it'll last a few more years until I am forced to remodel. I just found a hair line crack on another corner. It's barely noticeable but I saw it when I was cleaning.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    el último año

    I don't know how the sintered people can sleep at night.

  • turbocorbett
    el último año

    We started noticing uniform lines appearing in our Neolith which almost looks like the surface layer may be rubbing off or becoming worn. It a line approx every centimeter and can be see from all angles and in natural or over head lighting. Had anyone else experienced this with their Neolith counter tops. The backsplash seems fine it’s just the counter which obviously gets more use. Not sure if we should contact the installer Faithful Countertops out of New Jersey.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    el último año

    I'll bet the splash is doing it too, you're just not seeing it in the light. These streaks are too ubiquitous to be from use. Looks like manufacturer error to me.

  • Margo Margolis
    el último año

    Were these recently installed? The lines are very uniform-wondering if it is an imprint from packing materials. Have you tried cleaning to see if they can be removed?

  • nosoccermom
    el último año

    Well, I just returned from a friend’s house, drooling over their Neolith counters. They were installed 5 years ago and are in perfect condition, incl a huge one piece island. They had one tiny chip that was fixed. it’s a dark matte charcoal color with slight variation

  • Shannon Dyson
    el último año

    The Stone Collection in Dallas has a huge display room of Neolith and 1000's of slabs in all variations (honed, silk, polished). I asked about the cracking and I was told that it's only a problem on the polished surface because the "polish" is actually a piece of glass adhered to the surface of the slab. It's not real stone so there is no "polishing". If the polished slab is flexed, the glass on top will crack. They suggested polished only for wall treatments and using honed or silk on countertops. The honed and silk slabs look absolutely amazing! I had them bring out a slab and place it next to a marble slab and it's about 90% identical. Neolith doesn't have quite the "depth" of the marble but it doesn't get the stains from normal kitchen use either.

  • The_Lane_Duo
    el último año

    @Shannon Dyson You may want to read thru the comments...there has been some issues with staining as well. I was once considering this product but just too many negative reviews & issues, sadly. I have also seen it in person in the DFW area and it was stunning. If only I was confident it would stay that way.

  • Silverlined
    el último año
    Última modificación: el último año

    @Shannon Dyson It's a risky surface in many ways despite the stunning displays. Remember the slab shops are there to sell, so just compare advice from a variety of sources. If you do go with Neolith, there are only 2 fabricators in Dallas I would recommend to do it for you: #1 - Escobar Marble & Granite, #2 - Active Granite. Both those places have the skill and equipment to get the Neolith fabricated and installed in one piece reliably. Few fabricators can do that. Neither of those companies have remarkable online presences, but I did plenty of research and asking around, and the word on the street with kind of the underground current of knowledge is that these two are the best in the DFW area for Neolith and porcelain fabrication. Try Escobar first.

  • Shannon Dyson
    el último año

    I hear ya! So frustrating since it's such a huge investment! I read in one of the posts that Barkeepers Friend will take out the stains. You could only use on the honed or silk of course since it would scratch the polished. Seems like all of the slabs have some sort of cons....quartz is fake looking and you can't set hot pans on it (seems crazy to put this in a kitchen), granite can stain too and I can't find any with big veining (Alpinus or Patagonia is really interesting - very bold choice though), marble (my absolute fav) stains and etches, quartzite is limited in color and no really white backgrounds. Since they all have problems, I wonder if I should just go with my love, marble. Sigh!

  • AvatarWalt
    el último año
    Última modificación: el último año

    Shannon Dyson, we went through that same weigh-the-cons with different materials about four years ago and decided on silk Neolith Calacatta. There was only one Calacatta available at the time, but I've seen that they keep bringing out more designs and now I'm tempted to go to a stoyeyard just to look. :)

    We're 95% really happy with it, the only con being that the mitered edge is sharp and we've taken a couple of small chips out of it. They've been fixed, but I can still see them since I know where they are. There were some strange, very even marks on the surface too (manufacture, transport or fabrication?) and they had to come back and buff those off which changed the sheen in a couple of spots, but that seems to have gone away over time as I can't find them now. The 95% happy part: it doesn't look fake like quartz does, and I'm SO GLAD that it doesn't stain and is easy to clean. We're not particularly careful, so there's regularly coffee, wine bottle rings, olive oil, smushed berries, beet skins, lemon juice, and dregs of lots of other staining and etching stuff that gets on it, and what doesn't wipe right up comes out with BKF. I can't speak for everyone (of course), but I'm happy with our Neolith and would for sure consider if we were moving or remodeling again.

  • lucky998877
    el último año
    Última modificación: el último año

    Shannon, I also spent a good time going back and forth on what is the right fit for our future kitchen. My Alpinus countertops should be installed in late June / early July. Yes, it was a very bold choice of granite, but seriously I was so drawn to those slabs that once I found them, nothing else compared in person.

  • Silverlined
    el último año

    @Shannon Dyson If your first love is marble and next choice Neolith, I would go for marble since the pros and cons somewhat even out between the two surfaces in my opinion. Marble is a lifestyle choice due to being a little extra careful with it, but so many people just love it. If you take care of it right, it can be amazing. Also look into a Stoneguard coating that would make marble bulletproof. Even without Stoneguard, you can do regular sealing and occasional resurfacing and have yourself a magnificent kitchen with real marble. Some marbles are more durable than others, particularly the marbles with a higher dolomite content like Danby.

  • Shannon Dyson
    el último año

    lucky998877 PLEASE! post pics when you get them installed. I would love to see them!!! They are so striking and unique! Probably no one else in your neighborhood will have them.

  • Shannon Dyson
    el último año

    AvataWalt I seriously appreciate you responding!! Not many people come back to tell their story after a few years of use. I think the chipping would be ok with me. I've dealt with quartz chipping - big chips too! And you're right, once the chip is fixed, only you know it's there. I love to hear about your countertops not staining as my husband is the cook and a BBQ master so there is BBQ sauce everywhere! Lol! Your experience is swaying me!!! :)

  • Shannon Dyson
    el último año

    Belaria Great advice on the Stoneguard!! I just watched the youtube video and it's pretty incredible. I think the marble slabs and fabrication is better priced than Neolith as well. I'm going to research prices on Stoneguard. Decision, decisions!

  • Silverlined
    el último año

    @Shannon Dyson A lot of people with marble use trays for heavy work to protect the surface. You could lay out a countertop covering for the barbecue work and then stow it away when not in use. Something large like a Silpat comes to mind, but you could also use a large butcher block for that or inset an end-grain butcher block somewhere in the design for heavier work. Stoneguard runs about $25.00 per square foot. It's not cheap, but it works. The one drawback with Stoneguard is that it reduces the temperature resistance of the countertop, so you need to keep hot pots away from it. It can also look a little plasticy. Don't be afraid of real marble with a regular liquid sealant and occasional resurfacing. And also educate the family on keeping stain-producing things on trays or wiped up immediately.

  • AvatarWalt
    el último año
    Última modificación: el último año

    Shannon, you could probably get samples of different materials and give them a try with barbecue sauce. I did that with Neolith (no barbecue though--I didn't think of it!): Neolith Torture. Not to make it sound like we're total slobs, but I'm happy with not having to clean up immediately. If I leave stuff for a bit, a green scrubby will usually work, and, if not BKF has never failed. Part of me does pine for marble since it's natural and unique and beautiful, but, as you said, every material has it's pros and cons.

  • M
    el último año

    We originally planned on getting Neolith, but at the last minute pulled the rip cord and revised that decision. We now have stainless steel countertops and are very happy with the decision. Works beautifully for the overall design.


    If that is too modern for you, then a more traditional natural material is soapstone. It handles abuse much better than almost any other stone. But it is a "living" surface. It will show that it is being used. In that way, it is similar to our stainless surfaces.

  • Vic Bab
    el último año

    I’ve had mine installed for a month. Love it.

  • agk2003
    el último año

    vic bab that looks great. can i ask what brand of cabinets you chose? my sister is doing a reno and looking for inset cabinets.

  • Vic Bab
    el último año

    Fieldstone Charlene

  • laurabuster
    el último año

    Vic Bab, which neolith is this? Thanks!

  • Vic Bab
    el último año

    Neolith Calacatta honed

  • wilson853
    el último año

    @Vic Bab, That is stunning!

  • Vic Bab
    el último año

    Thank you!

  • Aaron Wilson
    el último año

    These reviews and conversations definitely have me staying away from Neolith/Dekton countertops. I'm thinking of going with Azerocnlean marble instead. The Azerocare treatment is supposed to reduce the etching and staining on the marble significantly.

    https://www.antolini.com/en/azerocare


  • vinmarks
    el último año

    Aaron Wilson better do your homework. Theres been many people dissatisfied with Azerocare. Read through this entire thread:

    https://www.gardenweb.com/discussions/5295365/azerocare-sealer-on-countertops-any-experience-or-feedback#n=173

  • Silverlined
    el último año

    @Aaron Wilson Stoneguard is a better choice than Azerocare if you want a protective coating.

  • Monica P
    el último año

    I am sad to have to join the conversation, but our Neolith countertops were to be installed this week and one shattered during fabrication. As stated above, getting warranty support failed immediately, with Neolith declining any responsibility for their product. I add my voice to those who have not yet made a purchase -stay away from this product.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    el último año

    Monica:

    Without knowing the circumstances, it is impossible to say if the Neolith shattered spontaneously or through fabricator error.

  • Monica P
    el último año

    The Neolith rep came out to check the fabricators settings before the cutting commenced. It was a certified installer. Just visited other slab yards this weekend and saw their Neolith marked down steeply and learned of similar stories.

  • PRO
    Olive Mill
    el último año

    Monica, Just to better understand, the fabricator broke the slab during fabrication. How would that impact you besides a small delay? I would assume they would get a new slab and finish fabrication followed by installation. This has happened to us numerous times and there is really no reason to talk to the customer unless the material is purchased by the customer rather than the fabricator.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    el último año

    Andy, good to see you here.


    Sintered fabricators need to buy, comprehend, and follow Roberto Colonatti's recently published fabrication manual. He's the best in the world.

  • ljhauson
    hace 12 meses

    Just talked to installer for a Neolith install and they said we have to pay for 2 extra slabs in case one cracks. Is this my responsibility? I asked what if they don't crack and he said I have 2 slabs to keep. ??! I this normal?

  • Vic Bab
    hace 12 meses

    No, that is bizarre. I paid for exactly what I needed for my kitchen. Go get it from a different reputable place.

  • Silverlined
    hace 12 meses

    The slab retailer Allure Natural Stone in Dallas, Texas, sells insurance on porcelain and some of its other more fragile slabs. That way, if it is destroyed during fabrication, transportation or installation, you do have some recourse without having to had purchased excess material at the outset.

  • PRO
    Olive Mill
    hace 12 meses

    Are you purchasing the slabs yourself or is the fabricator/installer buying them?

  • ivygray
    hace 10 meses

    Hello everyone. We have just had a neolith worktop and sink installed in our kitchen. After using the sink a handful of times a big chip on the edge of the sink broke off - the rest of the edge looks vulnerable to further chipping as it is looking scraggy. Neolith have put the blame on us saying something must have impacted with the edge - it didn't. Wish i had read the above posts before installing. Had it installed partly due to it's purported durability.

  • Silverlined
    hace 10 meses

    @ivygray Maybe @Joseph Corlett, LLC can advise you on replacing just the sink. Post a photo of the situation if you would like more help, please.

  • ivygray
    hace 10 meses


    Only have this one picture and we are not there at the moment. Any advise welcomed. Many thanks

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    hace 10 meses

    iveygray:


    It may be possible to replace your sink with something larger. If so, that would eliminate the chips. Pictures please.

  • Silverlined
    hace 10 meses

    @ivygray Your picture didn't post. Please try again and wait until the picture turns from a lighter or gray color to full color before you hit submit. Thanks.

  • ivygray
    hace 10 meses



  • Silverlined
    hace 10 meses

    When you are able, we will need more photos of the place where that chip came from to truly advise. Also, please provide a full view of the entire sink and surrounding cabinetry so Joseph can see how it is all installed. It is possible as he said for you to get a larger stainless steel sink to install and cut back the damaged edges.

  • rsiservices
    hace 9 meses

    Never waste your time, energy, or money on this product. We installed it in our home a few years ago and the wasted so many slabs as they kept breaking despite following their recommended handling and installation procedures. We go no support from the manufacturer or the distributor. Now, a few years later the product is popping of the floors and walls and cracking.

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