tdumas100

Induction Stove? My son, the chef, says "no"?

Terri D
hace 2 años

I like the simplicity and ease of cleaning an induction stove (from what I've read), but my son, a chef, says gas is better. What is your experience?

Comentarios (60)

  • H B
    hace 2 años

    ;-) who is going to do most of the cooking on your new stove?

    Mejor respuesta
  • PRO
    Edmond Kitchen & Bath LLC
    hace 2 años

    Induction can do everything gas can as far as temperature and control of heat. Consumer Reports said it broke their all-time speed record for boiling water. The only things gas does that induction can't do as well:

    - Wok (gas heats the upper edges of the pan)

    - Grill hotdogs on a fork (mom hated that when I was a kid)

    - Gas still works when the power goes out.

    In the South - where we live, we spend a lot of money on AC trying to cool our house in the summer. Gas defeats this in the kitchen. As Snaggy above said - you do need pans that a magnet will stick to (cast iron - stainless with ferrous metal, non-stick pans with steel cladding on the bottom). Induction pans usually are labeled so on the bottom.

    Or - do both. Like we did below.

  • PRO
    Mary Porzelt of Boston Kitchen Designs
    hace 2 años

    I have gas and an induction burner-I will definitely go full induction in the future

  • swrite
    hace 2 años
    Love cooking on my induction cooktop. Not sure why, but whenever this topic comes up so many people who have never cooked with induction, are misinformed about it, or confuse it with radiant electric, are always chiming in on here not to use induction. Yet, you’ll find most people who actually cook with induction love it & will tell you they’d never go back.
  • ninigret
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    my problem with induction is cooking on a glass top.

    i have a glass top electric at my vacation home, and its constantly getting little irreversible marks from someone being careless, and it takes 3 goes to clean it so its not a smeary mess.

    so even if cooking on induction is as good as/better than gas, cooking on a glass top isnt worth it for me.

    i love my gas cooktop. the 'heavy' grates arent going anywhere (and i can one hand them, so how heavy is that....?) i can slide my heavy cookware around and nothing bad happens.

    so, its what you cook and how you cook and how you like it to look after you have cooked.

  • Hamma
    hace 2 años

    Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words...

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    I cook a fair bit and have used gas and induction, and it really just depends which you prefer. They are both quite good for cooking, much better than normal electric. My dream kitchen would have both, as gas is a little better for some things, and induction is a little better for others.

    Best thing to do is find a good showroom where you can actually try both out. You can also get portable induction units, just single ring, for not a huge expense. The cheap induction portable units aren’t as good as the ones you get in a proper range or cooktop, but they’re good enough to get a feel for induction cooking, and I find mine quite handy as I can take it places - it’s been used in a buffet service to keep something warm, I’ve taken it outside to cook in the summer (often in combination with the grill) to keep the heat outside the house, etc.

  • opaone
    hace 2 años

    It's really personal preference in light of what things you want to be able to cook. Induction is not so great with pan searing, sautéing, wok and a few other things which is why restaurants always have gas and likely will for many years to come. And, as mentioned above, the proper pans are really critical w/ induction and as many people have discovered, just because it says it works for induction doesn't mean that it works well with induction.

    That said, many consumer gas ranges aren't so great with pan searing, sautéing, wok and a few other things either so an induction range may be as good or better than most consumer ranges.

    I know a couple of chef's who have gas in their restaurants and would never have anything else but have induction in their homes (both live in condo's that don't allow gas) and still produce very wonderful meals on their induction ranges.



  • PRO
    Edmond Kitchen & Bath LLC
    hace 2 años

    ninigret and others - the reason for the glass issue is this - on a red hot radiant cooktop, the hottest part of that system is that red hot element under the glass. When you have a boil over, you are literally frying on the glass. With Induction, the hottest part of the system is the bottom of the pan. With a boil over, the glass can get hot, but food is not frying on it. You can actually cook on a paper towel!

    And to opaone's point about the pans - there are some really bad ones out there. Rachel Ray has a series of pans with an orange handle. Although it says induction, the manufacturer skimped on the ferrous metal - it is painfully slow. You want pans that really grabs a magnet hard.

    When we are working with someone that is unsure, we loan them our portable unit to test drive for a week or so. Knowing that it is only 110 volts - 1800 watts (compared to a real 220v cooktop...), those that have tried it have gone that direction.

  • Fori
    hace 2 años

    I've had all of them and induction is best for me with gas a second. This time, I remodeled with gas for the fun of it (gas has fire, which is fun!) but I'm tempted to swap it out. I knew I might and have the range area wired sufficiently for induction. Induction is so much easier to clean and to control.

    But darn it. Gas is so quiet. My no-frills gas range has no electronics and thus no cooling fans.

    Try them both if you can. Ignore well-meaning son.

  • PRO
    Debbi Washburn
    hace 2 años

    If you live in an area where the power goes out a lot, a gas cooktop comes in very handy!

  • dadoes
    hace 2 años

    I've never seen a gas range/cooktop with pristine grates. They're always discolored to some degree, grease burned on that can't be removed, roughened, etc. So regards to long-term durability and appearance of grates vs. glass ... seems to me 6 of one, half-dozen of the other. My grandmother's gas range was always a hassle to clean whenever I did it. My neighbor has several rental properties that I've helped clean between tenants, all gas ranges, also a large hassle. My GE radiant-top range has one small scratch on the most-used burner in 14 years. It's patina. :-)

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    hace 2 años

    " The only things gas does that induction can't do as well:

    - Wok (gas heats the upper edges of the pan)"

    But you don't want the upper edges of the wok to be heated, at least not when you're stir frying.....it's the temperature differential that makes it work well. That's so you can move food out towards the edges as it's cooked, leaving the base to stir fry the latest additions while the previous stuff, now moved up and away from the base, doesn't get overcooked.

  • PRO
    BeverlyFLADeziner
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    I don't think the top of an induction top gets hot, so a mess on the glass top is not an issue.

    As for the pans, I think there is a lot of incorrect info out there. You can use cast iron on induction, so that's a plus.

    What kind of pans can you use on an induction cooktop?

    Induction cookware must be made of a magnetic-based material, such as cast iron or magnetic stainless steel. Fully clad cookware brands, such as All-Clad Stainless, Viking Cookware, and Mauviel M'cooks stainless work on induction cooktops because they're magnetic. The most obvious options include stainless steel, cast iron, and carbon steel. However, there are a few surprises when considering what pots and pans work well with induction cooktops – there are some nonstick aluminum and copper examples that will play nicely with induction.

  • Michelle misses Sophie
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    We have looked at both (having had a smoothtop electric years ago and gas rangetops for the past 20+ years). I do have a portable induction hob. There are advantages to induction, but I like to shake pans back and forth, blacken peppers right on the grates, toast tortillas right on the grates, flame sauces.... Induction units also have more complex electronics than the simple igniters of gas units, which does mean some longevity concerns (and if parts aren't available, do you now need to redo your countertop for a new cooktop?). Last week we had an igniter issue and DH was able to repair it easily - gas burners are very simple. I also don't want to worry about being gentle when I set a big enameled cast iron Dutch oven on the cooktop for fear of cracking the glass. Our next unit will again be gas.

  • hollybar
    hace 2 años

    Depends how you cook. Like Michelle,we use the flame way too much to have just induction. And since we live where there is major winter,I am not bopping outside to brush the snow off the Weber when it is freezing. I do have an induction hob that works quite well and I definitely appreciate the ease of cleanup.

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    I actually like induction also but we’re sticking with gas as the primary (like I said I have a portable induction unit I use for some things) in part because we’ve had a few problems with power due to weather and I don’t want to have to set up a camp stove to cook food or heat water.

  • PRO
    BeverlyFLADeziner
    hace 2 años

    After having electric for more than a decade, I spent the last 6 months with family that has a gas stove. I was amazed at the distracting smell of the flame and the cleaning is just a chore. It probably has a place in commercial kitchens, but I would never go back.

  • ifoco
    hace 2 años

    Dadoes,

    My six burner Russel Range is easy to clean and the grates don't look anything you described. They are cast iron not sure what is on the surface as they don't rust. When I do a thorough cleaning, I run them thru the dishwasher. Easy and good as new. I've never cooked on induction but have read enough on this forum why I would hesitate. " Can't have sugar or salt crystals - they scratch, can't slide pans across, they scratch, pans work then all of a sudden not, the glass shattered and on. Induction can't sense the pot./pot too small/pot too large.

    The big thing everyone mentions is how fast one can bring a big pot of water to a boil. If I was running an Italian restaurant, that would be very important. For me however, just isn't really important. Being a messy cook all of the above would negate using induction. I like the fact you can light the burners if the pieseo (sp) goes out or the power fails. Maybe the real reason I won't give up gas is because I'm a potter who works with thousands of BTU burners and all potters are fire bugs/pyromaniacs to some extent ::))


    Inga

  • swrite
    hace 2 años
    I’m laughing about the can’t have sugar or salt crystals. Who writes this stuff? (That’s not a dig at you previous poster.) I’ve spilled all mentions of grains, sugars, salts, liquids, you name it across my cooktop. You just wipe it off like any other cooking appliance. Not as big a deal either since only the burner area is hot & not the whole surface. My pots are not high-end & they function w/ my cooktop just fine. Seriously, this is some of the misinformation I’m talking about. And some people never read the directions or learn how to properly use their appliances in the first place. I’ve also seen people write reviews for things that aren’t even the correct model. And then there are those who think radiant electric & induction are the same thing. Induction is used for cooking on cruise ships & has been used across Europe, but for some reason here in the U.S. people are scared to death of it. Reminds me of a talk we heard on the history of electricity and how scared people were of it initially. There were all kinds of misconceptions & people didn’t want it in their homes. I feel like we’re going through the same thing now in the modern era w/ things like electric vehicles & induction cooking. It will kill your babies! It will melt your liver! It will tie you up while you’re sleeping & destroy your house! You can’t have friends over or it will call them names! Seriously, it’s just another method of warming the pot & nothing to freak out over. Makes some happy, scares the crap out of others apparently. Amusing, nonetheless.
  • dan1888
    hace 2 años

    Induction tops don't scratch any more than the Ceran that have been around for decades without shattering. Light scratches don't matter and don't count. The bottoms of your pans don't get crud baked on like gas and Ceran(750 degrees) so you can slide them across the surface. They stay clean. Major chefs like Heston Blumenthal of the Fat Duck in Britain use induction commercially and in their home kitchens. And his restaurant was voted #1 in the world(2005). 3 Michelin stars.

  • Maria Privat
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    If you want to waste time and effort, I'd go for gas. If you like things to heat up in a jiffy and hear yourself say: "What? Does it boil already?" than go for induction. If you love cleaning up afterwards scrubbing your hands raw, but never quite satisfied: go for gas. If you do one quick paper towel wipe for the moist and then a quick wet towel wipe and love to be done cleaning in under a minute: go induction.

    I've had gas for decades and I didn't miss it one single second. However I do sing praises about induction. This question to me falls in the category of: "Do you do your laundry by hand or in a machine?" For it makes a huge difference.

  • opaone
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    IIRC, Fat Duck also had some high heat fast recovery flat tops for searing and other tasks that they found could not be done on the commercial induction tops.

    It all comes down to how much cooking people are doing and what they want to be able to accomplish. For many and perhaps most people induction will be completely fine, for others it would be insufficient.

  • 2ManyDiversions
    hace 2 años

    Not having induction yet (said that already), I looked up searing on induction, because I do like a good tenderloin, nicely seared. If you use cast iron, apparently, searing is not an issue... and that's what I use to sear meat, what I use for stir fry. And that made my decision for me... but I still think this is a personal choice.

    Induction VS. Gas: What's the Fastest Way to Sear a Steak?

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    My Dream Kitchen would have both. European companies have been making modular cooktops to allow people to do just that kind of thing for years.

  • opaone
    hace 2 años

    @2ManyDiversions, interesting find. That's very different from what I've experienced and been told by chef's I know.

    @PirateFoxy, you can get single or dual countertop induction cookers which would allow you to have both a gas range and induction cookers.

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    @opaone - I have a single portable induction. I’d like a built-in 1-2 ring induction, but this kitchen doesn’t have room for it. In my Dream Kitchen I’d probably just do something like 2 4 ring ranges next to each other, one gas one electric. So 4 gas burners, 4 induction, 2 ovens.

  • Anthony C
    hace 2 años

    My parents have had an induction stove for the last 15 years or so. It was *impossible* to keep clean for whatever reason. Stuff was baked onto the glass. I tried to clean it and it just could never get clean.


    And Im sure it was induction as when they made the switch many of their old pots could not be used.

  • nidnay
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    I have gas, but seriously, induction is pretty darn fast for boiling water as well as having very precise temperature control. Thermador’s freedom cooktop allows for any size pot or pan and you can freely move it to anywhere on the cooktop (you’re not limited to specific areas on the cooktop for pot placement).

    And here’s one they haven’t invented yet.

  • Janice jones
    hace 2 años

    I would always suggest gas. I use an induction in my outdoor kitchen. It's great but requires induction ready cookware. But the real reason to have a gas range in your home is because it's the number one thing on a potential homeowner's kitchen wish list. If you're interested in your potential resale value (and you always should be even if you aren't thinking about selling anytime soon), please go with gas.

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    hace 2 años

    "But the real reason to have a gas range in your home is because it's the
    number one thing on a potential homeowner's kitchen wish list. If
    you're interested in your potential resale value (and you always should
    be even if you aren't thinking about selling anytime soon), please go
    with gas."

    I think that's among the stupidest reasons I've heard! If someone's spending time, energy, and money on renovations, they should build what they want, not what hypothetical future owners might want.

    Besides, I find it really hard to believe that a gas stove is that high on a kitchen wish list, given that the stove is an easy thing to replace (as opposed to replacing the counter top, sink, or cabinetry).

  • jwvideo
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    Just like all real chefs will never have induction in their kitchens, eh? My gosh, think of all those people who will never accept induction because they cannot make ultra-gourmet s'mores on their stove tops.

  • Janice jones
    hace 2 años

    Dear Toronto Veterinarian, I am very surprised that you would call me stupid. Shame on you. We all have different opinions and I would never do that to someone who has a different opinion from mine.

    Yes, we are all allowed to do whatever we want in our own homes. But this site is a place where people ask for an opinion or guidance that hopefully is based on some personal experience.

    I have been a designer and real estate broker for many years, and was just stating what I know to be fact. And adding a gas cooktop or range in the future means a fairly expensive deal to add that gas line if one isn't there already. You can't plug in a gas stove, but you can plug in an electric or induction stove. It's considered a capital improvement.

    I was just giving my professional opinion in response to the question. And yes, it is a fact that most buyers are looking for a gas cooktop or gas range. I didn't pull that out of thin air. I like induction, but not everybody out there is convinced especially when they learn you might have to buy new cookware. I have both, for the record.

    I hope that you don't call your clients or their ideas stupid. It's very unprofessional.

  • just_janni
    hace 2 años

    In my kitchen, with pretty high end European appliances I am definitely going induction. The clean modern look demands it - so gas would be completely inappropriate in my space.

    Also, as houses get tighter - please don't tout the benefits of using the gas cooktop when the power goes out. It's 100% dangerous and most houses require make up air when the kitchen exhaust fan is on - which obviously can't be done without power.

    If your power goes off often get a generator. Or, periodically - grill outside.

  • dadoes
    hace 2 años

    "Janice Jones: And yes, it is a fact that most buyers are looking for a gas cooktop or gas range."

    I would never buy a house with a gas range or cooktop. So, maybe "most" but not me.

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    Jannicone - open a window. We’re talking about cooking in fairly specific circumstances, not an everyday thing. I’m not even sure where we’d be able to safely put a generator and fuel for it, we live in the city and have very little in the way of a yard or land to put such things and I certainly wouldn’t want to be storing gas in the basement. (We do not have a garage.)

    Yes, you’ll get grease etc. in the house, so it isn’t recommended for everyday, but with the vent not working you won’t need the make up air running either. Just don’t smoke up the kitchen searing steak maybe.

  • sherri1058
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    Sorry Janice, I don't agree that my kitchen should be built for some
    future unknown person. Why would I want to use something that I don't
    want for the sake of what some unknown person might want? That's just dumb. And what if the buyer is like Toronto Vet, or dadoes, or myself, or any number of others that want induction?

    "You can't plug in a gas stove, but you can plug in an electric or induction stove."

    No, you can't just plug in an induction stove. It's not the same as a toaster. I've done renovations and put in a gas stove, and I've put in induction, and with my house, it was a lot more expensive to run the electrical for my induction than it was to run the gas. I agree that 10 years ago most people wanted gas, but today?.... not so much.

    @PirateFoxy: We live in the city and have a generator. It is plumbed into our gas line, so no storing gas in the basement.

    Terri: Love my induction. Will never go back to gas or regular electric if I can help it!

  • Toronto Veterinarian
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    "Dear Toronto Veterinarian, I am very surprised that you would call me stupid. Shame on you"

    I didn't. I said it was a stupid reason for doing something. Smart people can make stupid decisions sometimes.

    "and was just stating what I know to be fact."

    I'd love some references for that fact, because I really suspect it's not much more than marketers' opinions. But, please, share your factual basis with us.

    "No, you can't just plug in an induction stove. It's not the same as a
    toaster. I've done renovations and put in a gas stove, and I've put in
    induction, and with my house, it was a lot more expensive to run the
    electrical for my induction than it was to run the gas."

    It very much depends on the house and the current wiring/power set up. I was able to just plug in my induction range, but my condo is fairly new. Others have to build/adjust their home's wiring.

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    Huh, everyone I know who has a generator has a gasoline or similar one. Not natural gas.

  • pungogirl67
    hace 2 años
    Just our experience...
    My husband and I built out dream home in 2000 and put in a gas cooktop...something we had always wanted. We loved the way it cooked...fast on/off and the adjustability of the heat, BUT, we hated the ongoing cleanup...keeping the gas pinholes cleaned so the gas would flow and burners would function properly was a chore. Keep in mind, this was a very “high end” JA cooktop, so we didn’t scrimp on cost for our appliances in our dream home. We had invested so much in our kitchen we just couldn’t admit we were not happy with our choice of cooktops. After 10+ years, we remodeled our kitchen and put in a high-end JA induction cooktop. We LOVE it! The speed of the on/off is even better than gas. Waiting on a large pot of water to boil for cooking pasta is no longer a problem. The huge added bonus is the SAFETY factor of the induction. When you remove the pot, the eye won’t stay on over a minute! For us older folks, that’s a good thing...especially when someone else cooks in our kitchen. As a matter of fact, we have just built a small second home and our choice of cooktop was another induction. Both of our houses are open floor plans, so easy clean ability is pretty important to us! Good luck with your decision!
  • cpartist
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    My parents have had an induction stove for the last 15 years or so. It was *impossible* to keep clean for whatever reason. Stuff was baked onto the glass. I tried to clean it and it just could never get clean.

    And Im sure it was induction as when they made the switch many of their old pots could not be used.

    If things were baked on, it absolutely could NOT be induction since the surface of induction cooktops do NOT get hot, so nothing can bake onto it.

    What they probably had was a radiant heat cooktop.

  • cpartist
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    Dear Toronto Veterinarian, I am very surprised that you would call me stupid. Shame on you. We all have different opinions and I would never do that to someone who has a different opinion from mine.

    She didn't call YOU stupid. She said it was a STUPID REASON. Big difference!

  • cpartist
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    Jannicone - open a window. We’re talking about cooking in fairly specific circumstances, not an everyday thing. I’m not even sure where we’d be able to safely put a generator and fuel for it, we live in the city and have very little in the way of a yard or land to put such things and I certainly wouldn’t want to be storing gas in the basement. (We do not have a garage.)

    If you have a gas line, you don't need to store gasoline. You hook up the generator to the gas line. In fact back during Hurricane Sandy, those who had gasoline generators were out of luck since gas stations couldn't pump gas. Those who had generators hooked up to gas lines had heat and electricity.

    Huh, everyone I know who has a generator has a gasoline or similar one. Not natural gas.

    Maybe you need to research.

  • KD
    hace 2 años

    Cpartist - I have no practical need for a generator. We loose power only often enough that I prefer the option of having the gas there if we really need it. I have no reason to have researched a generator, and as I said, the people I know with them definitely aren’t using natural gas - they all live in the middle of nowhere so there isn’t a gas line to connect to. Most of them use gasoline/diesel because they have space for a proper tank for storing a quantity of it and need to store a bunch of fuel for running tractors and other farm equipment anyway. Plus I suspect they feel relatively comfortable doing work on a diesel engine since again they do it on the truck/tractor/other farm equipment already.

    If you live in an area with hurricanes or other frequent major issues that cause lasting power outages, you absolutely should consider a generator or some other back up power option and probably you should consult an expert about the best choice for your particular needs and situation, as people vary in what they want to run and how much they’re willing to mess with things, too. (Meaning push button vs get it out and set it up vs...) In that scenario a cooking surface is not your only concern anyway - with no power at all your fridge and freezer may be a big issue, and cell phone, and so on. Being able to light your cooktop with a match isn’t going to charge your phone so you can find out what’s going on.

    When we lose power here, it’s usually due to a relatively localized bad storm, lasts for less than 24 hours, and happens a handful of times a year. Cracking a window in those circumstances is adequate - we don’t typically do any major cooking, mostly it’s just heating water for hot drinks and that sort of thing.

  • opaone
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    The vast majority of residential back-up generators here are natural gas or LP. The only petrol we see are the small portable ones.

    Generators are beginning to be replaced by solar + battery systems though which is what we are likely doing.

  • writersblock (9b/10a)
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    What are you considering, opaone? Powerwall, sonnenschein, or something else?

    And yeah, here in FL I don't know of any kind of gasoline-powered built-in gens, only natural gas or LP.

  • Nothing Left to Say
    hace 2 años

    I have had electric (coil and radiant), gas, and induction. I loved my induction and the thing I hate most about my kitchen in our new house is the gas cooktop.


    My bottom of the line frigidaire induction range held a low temperature beautifully (I could boil the water then put my oatmeal on low heat and go get ready for the day with no burning on the bottom--not so with my current gas cooktop even on the "simmer" burner).


    My bottom of the line induction range also boiled water much much faster than any gas I have ever had--even with my current gas top's "turbo" burner. Maybe some high end or pro gas burner would be faster?


    Induction was also a thousand times easier to clean. Becasue the surface itself doesn't get very hot, nothing bakes on. And no grates to clean and to move around. Cleaning my induction range top never took more than ten minutes--usually a minute or less. Cleaning my current gas range top takes a minimum of twenty--often thirty.


    And induction is safer. No flames to catch a potholder on fire, etc. This is extra nice with kids in the house.


    If it were feasible to replace my gas range top with an induction model without having to remodel the whole kitchen, we would have already done it--despite the whole kitchen being brand new because it is in a brand new house. I hate my gas cooktop and loved induction that much.


    (As far as potential buyers, I obviously was very disappointed to see a gas range top in our kitchen. If I had had a comparable house to buy with induction, you can bet I would have.)

  • opaone
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    @writersblock, likely Powerwalls. We have a couple of Tesla's and are planning a Tesla solar roof. A friend has Sonnen and has been quite happy so far.

    @crl_, what model is the gas cooktop you dislike so much? I agree, many and perhaps most are quite poor when it comes to simmer. There's a vast difference in those and higher end models though. You have to be careful about generalizing too much.

    A 22k or 25k open gas burner does boil water much faster than sealed or lessor BTU burners, whether faster than induction I have no idea.


  • PRO
    Debbi Washburn
    hace 2 años

    I think this conversation just shows that both are liked and disliked..... it needs to be a personal decision and thats the end of it! I design kitchens all day long and folks are split.... especially now that more companies are doing the induction ranges. For a long while you could only get induction in a cooktop. You are also subject to whether you already have gas at your home or not.

    I truly believe that when people are shopping for a home they may say they prefer to have gas only because they are comparing it to the electric coil/radiant ranges and may be unfamiliar with induction.

    Good luck to you in your decision!

  • Sue 430
    hace 2 años

    I love my induction. It heats so quickly, holds low temps so much better than my previous stove and always looks great as it is SUPER easy to keep clean. I think that many people ask for gas because they see all those people on the hgtv shows saying things like “oh a gas range, perfect”. Most may never have heard of or tried induction. I know chefs who enjoy cooking on both.

  • artemis_ma
    hace 2 años
    Última modificación: hace 2 años

    Pirate, my generator will be propane, like the heat I have in the house already.

    Oh, I went with an induction range, possibly the same Frigidaire model crl_ had. So far, I love it. I have cooked on gas , but not extensively. I like its speed in heating up and cooling down, and its ease of cleanup.

    But I haven't done sufficient cooking on gas to evaluate that other choice - other than feeling safer somehow with induction.

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