knob_lydia

Quartzite stains

Lydia knoblock
hace 4 años




Hi everyone I'm new to this kitchen remodel thing and I am struggling with countertop, I want quartz but have looked at so many different colors and brands and I'm not finding one that's white with a lot of gray in it. I found this quartzite at a local countertop fabricator it's called Ocean Shore, they provided me with a sample, I was expressing my concerns about stains so he sealed the sample it and sent me home with it. After 20 minutes of testing various foods I noticed the orange juice, soda, and lemon all left marks. Is their any way we can prevent this from happening after install? So far the mustard, BBQ sauce and ketchup have not left a mark yet? Would this real quartzite, I've heard real quartzite shouldn't leave any marks, when I asked him for more info about it he said it was polished not honed and it's both soft and hard quartzite. Any other questions I should ask to ensure I don't get screwed?

Thank you

Comentarios (23)

  • smitrovich
    hace 4 años

    Quartz is better for resisting staining and etching.

  • PRO
    Tali Hardonag Architect
    hace 4 años

    Or you can go to a manufactured material -( will not stain)

    e.g. Dekton. http://www.dekton.com/usa/colors/kairos

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    hace 4 años

    "Is their any way we can prevent this from happening after install?"


    No. None. I don't care if the stone salesman signs in the blood of his first born male child.


    You'll soon be able to buy marble from Antolini that will etch in hours instead of instantly though. It doesn't come in a can, it's proprietary, and Italy is a long way aways.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    hace 4 años
    Última modificación: hace 4 años

    you have a combo of quartzite/marble. etching occurs when concentrated acids have a chemical reaction w/the calcite. marble it calcium carbonate. oftentimes there is a combo of quartzite and calcium carbonate in a slab (a slab that the sellers have marked as pure quartzite).

    Pure, white quartzite is somewhat rare. It is a bit stronger than granite and can resists etching and staining. But it's also more expensive.

    Taj majal quartzite and white macaubus quartzite, should be pure, and they are also expensive. More than marble or granite. Is this piece they are showing you, a higher end price point?

    Finding the pure quartzite is the issue. a lot of stone companies know that people are shying away from marble so they misrepresent the stone as 'quartzite'. it does probably have some quartzite veins in it, but as you can see, the etching is because of the calcite, or marble. take a glass shard and try to scratch the stone. glass will scratch marble, but not the others.

    There is no way to prevent this. Go somewhere else or look at a different stone.

    Maybe this will shed some light on the make up for you:

    To understand why quartzite may etch, it’s important to understand its origins.

    Starting its life as sandstone, quartzite forms when sandstone and quartz are together, under tremendous amounts of heat and pressure. This causes the empty grains of sandstone to become filled with quartz—a process that actually makes the quartzite harder than quartz. Quartzite is a very strong and durable material that possesses a high resistance to heat and stains. Since it’s made primarily of silica, quartzite actually has a very high resistance to anything acidic (which is the culprit of etching).

    But, in some quartzite slabs, there can be traces of calcium carbonate—a substance that reacts very easily to acid. If these areas come into contact with acids, this can cause localized etching. Mild etching still feels smooth and can be removed with a polishing powder. Deeper etches feel rough and may be cloudy looking. You’ll want to contact a stone restoration professional to address these etches.

  • PRO
    Sophie Wheeler
    hace 4 años

    Never ascribe anything to maliciousness that can be explained by common ignorance. Stone retailers do not get a geological education. They only know ''pretty''.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    hace 4 años
    Última modificación: hace 4 años

    yeah well, one would think that if you are in the business of importing stones, that you would know the diff between marble, granite and quartzite. that's your job. you don't need a degree in geology to understand the differences. Ignorance years ago, before these countertops were popular, was a valid excuse. Not so much now that the jig is up,,,so to speak.

    technically speaking, that stone she had was 'quartzite', some of it. they just neglected to inform her of the 'marble' portion.

  • PRO
    JAN MOYER
    hace 4 años

    Just get a quartz counter top. Really.........do you need to borrow or BUY trouble? If you can't live with possible etching.....do quartz.

  • Kayla Marie
    hace 4 años
    We put quartzite in our new home and had the same concerns about etching. We ended up going with the leathered finish so we could avoid etching and are doing bulletproof sealing to avoid staining. Good luck!
  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    hace 4 años

    This isn't about performance; it's about love.

  • 902 Juanita
    hace 4 años

    Get basic- you brought a sample home to test. It failed your test. Seems like a time to move on...

  • gtcircus
    hace 4 años
    Well I just installed sea pearl quartzite. I went with honed. No issue with etching then.
  • PRO
    Cancork Floor Inc.
    hace 4 años

    Sealants prevent STAINS (colour transfer) but they do very little for acid etching (and yes...water can do some of those same things). If this is something you can live with (many people cannot), then go ahead and get your stone. If you are one of many who cannot STAND the thought of etching (changing the gloss level with acids), then move away from stones such as this....and move away from the higher gloss finishes.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    hace 4 años
    Última modificación: hace 4 años

    Overnight watermelon leak before:

    After:

    The table leg is pointing to a reflection of the ceiling fan. That's shadow, not etch. She had faucet funk too, but I got most of that out without pulling it.

    Two hours work, two hours drive time, that was nearly a $400.00 watermelon.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    hace 4 años

    watermelon is acidic? who knew? nice job Joseph. do you actually do the entire slab or a spot treatment?

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    hace 4 años
    Última modificación: hace 4 años

    I spot treat, then blend in. I could have spent all day on these tops. When I had my area flashing matte and gloss, it matched perfectly. She was delighted.

  • Anne Thomas
    hace 4 años
    Quartzite etches. I have it. I think it is beautiful. But it does etch like marble. It doesn't stain like marble though. If I had to do it all over again I would go with quartz so I could cook worry-free.
  • PRO
    Cinar Interiors, Inc.
    hace 4 años

    Sealing helps protect the stone, it does not make it stain or etch proof. You'd be better off with a man made quartz if you're planning or expecting to have foods as these left on the surface of your counter top.

  • willye
    hace 4 años

    Wescan Marble & Stone Restoration.

    There is a a product called Tuff Skin. Once applied to vanities, counter tops or natural stone side tables it's guaranteed never to etch or stain for life. It's is liquid impermeable but allows the stone to breathe naturally.

  • PRO
    Joseph Corlett, LLC
    hace 4 años

    No Tuff Skin, please. Stoneguard is the way to go.

  • KateF
    hace 4 años

    That fabricator did not give you real quartzite. Real quartzite does not stain or etch. Definitely try another stone yard.

  • PRO
    Beth H. :
    hace 4 años

    KateF,,,you couldn't be more wrong. Yes, real quartzite can stain or etch.

  • PRO
España
Personalizar mi experiencia con el uso de cookies

Al continuar en este sitio o utilizar esta aplicación, acepto que el grupo Houzz pueda utilizar cookies y tecnologías similares para mejorar sus productos y servicios, ofrecerme contenido relevante y personalizar mi experiencia. Saber más.